Sony is thankfully following Microsoft’s suit, by developing an accessible controller for use by those with disabilities. It was announced during CES, and goes by the code name of Project Leonardo.

Project Leonardo for PS5 is a canvas for gamers to craft their own play experience. It includes a robust kit of swappable components, including a variety of analog stick caps and buttons in different shapes and sizes.

Players can use these components to craft a wide array of control layouts. And the distance of the analog stick from the game pad can be adjusted to suit the player’s preference. These components allow players to find a configuration that works for their strength, range of motion, and particular physical needs.

On the PS5 console players have an array of options to tailor their Project Leonardo play experience:

Button mapping

  • The controller’s buttons can be programmed to any supported function and multiple buttons can be mapped to the same function. Conversely, players can map two functions (like “R2” + “L2”) onto the same button.

Control profiles

  • Players can store their programmed button settings as control profiles and easily switch between them by pressing the profile button.
    Up to three control profiles can be stored and accessed by the player from their PS5 console at any time.

Project Leonardo can be used out of the box, or can be paired with a DualSense controller.

“Project Leonardo is part of the PS5 product family and is based on the same design concept. We were inspired by the idea of all players enjoying the world of PlayStation together. Our team tested over a dozen designs with accessibility experts, looking for approaches that would help address key challenges to effective controller use. We finally settled on a ‘split controller’ design that allows near free-form left/right thumbstick repositionability, can be used without needing to be held, and features very flexible button and stick cap swapping.

“Because players can customize Project Leonardo according to their needs, there is no one ‘right’ form factor. We want to empower them to create their own configurations. The controller can also flexibly accept combinations of accessibility accessories to create a unique aesthetic. I am excited that the design will be completed through collaboration with players rather than presenting them with a single form factor.”

(So Morimoto, Designer, Sony Interactive Entertainment)

If you want to learn some more about this amazing product, please check out its PlayStation Blog post.

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